Revival of GM plant is part of stage manager’s future — and past

When Scott Mobley looks around Third Rail Studios’ Flex Space, he’s hit with a vision worthy of Bran Stark of “Game of Thrones.” It’s a flash from the past, when Scott’s dad Harold stood in the same room working on the General Motors assembly line in the late 1960s.Scott Mobley

The scene today for Scott, the stage manager at Third Rail Studios, is one of polished concrete floors, sound-proof walls and state-of-the-art lighting.

The studio is part of a bigger plan for Assembly, a new mixed use development including, dining, retail and more designed to transform the sprawling, obsolete General Motors Plant, which opened in 1947 and closed in 2008.

“We’re part of bringing this place back to life, and that’s exciting,” says Scott.

Scott is part of the growing team at Third Rail Studios, which opened in November with 60,000 square feet of stages, 30,000 square feet of production offices and nearly 70,000 square feet of open space used to build sets and props. Productions filmed at the studio include “Rampage” with Dwayne Johnson, scheduled for release next year, and “An Actor Prepares” with Jeremy Irons.

Scott Mobley 3For Scott, Third Rail and Georgia’s thriving film industry is a chance to put his passion to work here at home. A native of south Atlanta — he grew up in College Park and attended high school in McDonough — he now lives in Cumming. He’s chased film work around the southeast, working on productions such as “Treme” in New Orleans and “My Fellow Americans” in North Carolina, a film where he built a replica of the White House Oval Office.

 

His Georgia work includes “Resurrection” and “Dolly Parton’s Coat of Many Colors.”   His first movie was “Fried Green Tomatoes,” released in 1991 and filmed in Georgia locations that include Juliette, Fayetteville and Newnan.

“It used to be that if you wanted a career in the film industry, you had to travel, chase the work around and uproot your family to get work,” Scott says. “Now we’re able to set up roots in Georgia.

“That works for me — I love this business.”

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